The Art of Tea and Poetry

The Art of Tea and Poetry

Iced Tea: Smooth and Slightly Sweet Hibiscus

2 finger of fresh ginger root (the bigger and thicker; the spicier the tea) 1/3 cup cane sugar 5 tbls. loose hibiscus or 5 hibiscus tea bags 21/2 tbls. freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice Put 5 cups water, ginger,...

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Spiced Ice Tea and Rough and Raw Writing Recipe

Spiced IceTea Ingredients: 12 cloves whole 4 cinnamon sticks (broken to release the essence) 6 cracked cardamom pods a long thin strip of lemon zest 8 tsps. loose black tea leaves or herbs: lemongrass, lemon verbena or lemon balm* 1/2...

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Iced Ginger Mint Tea

(with a touch of honey and a dash of poetry) 6 cups water 1/3 cup ginger root, peeled and sliced 6 level teaspoons of loose green tea (one level teaspoon per cup) 1/3 cup fresh mint leaves (slightly crushed to...

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Iced Green Chai and Lime / Wasabi Wisdom

Ingredients: 4 cups of water 2 inches of ginger root sliced (peeled if not organic) 4 cardamom pods (lightly crushed) 4 cinnamon sticks 2 tablespoons loose green tea leaves 1 or more stevia leaf/ves (optional) In a medium saucepan, put...

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Spices of Rhyme and Thyme 10

"Free verse" is an oxymoron. Unlike sonnets, villanelle or sestinas; free verse or open form do not follow a fixed structure or pattern. Yet, verse means construct. Hence, the 100 year conundrum. How is it possible to recognize, let alone, critique free verse and/or open form? One approach is determining what free-verse isn't through poetic conventions: alliteration / end or internal rhyme patterns, rhythm and meter, couplet, tercet, quatrain, cinquain, sestet, septet or octave.

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